Posts Tagged: engineering

Machine learning offers new way of designing chiral crystals

Machine learning offers new way of designing chiral crystals

Logistic regression analysis model predicts ideal chiral crystal   Engineers and chemists at Hiroshima University successfully used the same technology at the core of facial recognition to design chiral crystals. This is the first study reporting the use of this technology, called logistic regression analysis, to predict which chemical groups are best for making chiral molecules. Results were published in Chemistry Letters. Chirality describes the quality of possessing a mirror image to something else, but without the ability to superimpose it. Your left foot, for example, is a mirror of your right. They look similar, but they are not the same. This is why you cannot wear a left shoe… Read more

Toshiro Takabatake, thermoelectrics

Toshiro Takabatake, thermoelectrics

A Conversation with Distinguished Professor Toshiro Takabatake “This is what we’re looking for: a material with low thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity and that can create a high voltage.”   Distinguished Professor Toshiro Takabatake lists the facts of his research without special emphasis, relaxed in his office at Hiroshima University.  He joined the university originally in 1988 when much of the faculty was still based at the Hiroshima city campus.  He relocated to the new main campus in Saijo during the 1990s and moved between two other departments before settling in the Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter in 1998.  He has hosted many international students and faculty… Read more

Toshinori Tsuru, chemical engineering

Toshinori Tsuru, chemical engineering

A Conversation with Distinguished Professor Toshinori Tsuru In the natural environment, salt mixes with water in the ocean and carbon dioxide mixes with methane in natural gas deposits.  The same mixing of molecules is common when chemists create useful compounds, as at the end of the reaction when leftover hydrogen mixes with ammonia, a chemical used in fertilizers and household cleaners.  Usually only one molecule is valuable, but separating the desired molecule from the unwanted ones at the tiny, molecular-sized scale is a complicated task.  One approach is to build a filter that only lets the desirable molecule pass through.  Professor Toshinori Tsuru is a leader in the field of… Read more

Hiroshima University research on thin films of nanoparticles wins publication award

Hiroshima University research on thin films of nanoparticles wins publication award

Results from Hiroshima University researchers earned an Outstanding Paper award from the Journal of Chemical Engineering of Japan.  The research was completed by Assistant Professor Masaru Kubo, Yuki Mantani, and Professor Manabu Shimada.  Mantani was a Masters student at the time of the research. “Using our method, individual particles fall like snow,” said Professor Manabu Shimada, a chemical engineer in the Graduate School of Engineering.  This project attracted positive attention from the scientific community previously; in 2013, Assistant Professor Masaru Kubo won a best poster presentation honor at a scientific conference in Sydney, Australia. “I believe our results get this attention because they are relevant to so many other researchers…. Read more

Shaking Up Surgery

Shaking Up Surgery

New vibrations in old tools allow surgeons to feel what they can’t touch A small vibrating device added to surgical tools could improve surgeons’ sensitivity to different shapes and textures inside their patients’ bodies. Engineers from Hiroshima University have designed the small vibrating device to attach to any existing hand-held surgical tool and be used instantly, without requiring extra training for doctors. During minimally invasive surgeries, surgeons rely on long, thin, metal tools to explore their patients’ bodies. Such laparoscopic surgeries benefit patients by reducing the size of surgical cuts and minimizing scarring, but surgeons can no longer use their fingers to directly touch patients to sense essential information about… Read more

New electronic stethoscope and computer program diagnose lung conditions

New electronic stethoscope and computer program diagnose lung conditions

The classic stethoscope has entered the digital age. Medical researchers have created a computer program that connects to an electronic stethoscope to classify lung sounds into five common diagnostic categories. The Respiratory Sounds Visualizer computer program and the new electronic stethoscope with a high sensitivity for lung sounds were developed by a team of three physician researchers at Hiroshima University and Fukushima Medical University, in collaboration with the industrial company Pioneer Corporation. Recorded lung sounds of 878 patients were classified by respiratory specialist doctors.  The researchers then turned these diagnoses into templates to create a mathematical formula that evaluates the length, frequency, and intensity of lung sounds.  The computer program… Read more

Terahertz wireless technology could bring fiber-optic speeds out of a fiber

Terahertz wireless technology could bring fiber-optic speeds out of a fiber

Hiroshima, Japan — Hiroshima University, the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, and Panasonic Corporation announced the development of a terahertz (THz) transmitter capable of signal transmission at a per-channel data rate of over ten gigabits per second over multiple channels at around 300 GHz. The aggregate multi-channel data rate exceeds one hundred gigabits per second. The transmitter was implemented as a silicon CMOS integrated circuit, which would have a great advantage for commercialization and consumer use. This technology could open a new frontier in wireless communication with data rates ten times higher than current technology allows. Details of the technology were presented at the “International Solid-State Circuit Conference… Read more

New membrane may solve fresh water shortages

New membrane may solve fresh water shortages

  Researchers at Hiroshima University have developed a technology that improves the removal of salt from seawater, a breakthrough that may alleviate the increasing demand for fresh water in some countries. “A global shortage of fresh water is a long-term challenge that mankind faces in this century,” said the director of the ROBUST membrane project, Professor Toshinori Tsuru. Professor Tsuru and his team have designed a new kind of ultra-thin layered membrane that acts as a sieve and separates salt from seawater to produce fresh water, a technique known as reverse osmosis. The membrane is partly made from silicon and overcomes several challenges of existing designs by tolerating the harsh… Read more

Wearable equipment supports human motion where and when needed

Wearable equipment supports human motion where and when needed

  A new model of pneumatic muscle and an active type of assistive equipment incorporating this pneumatic muscle has been developed at Hiroshima University and Daiya Industry Co. Ltd., Japan. This wearable equipment, called the Unplugged Powered Suit (UPS), supports human movement without requiring any electronic devices and tanks because it employs a newly developed pneumatic muscle named Pneumatic Gel Muscle (PGM) as an actuator. The UPS improves the quality of life of not only elderly individuals but also healthy people who enjoy sports activities. The UPS will be displayed at the International Robot Exhibition 2015 in December. To prevent injury and accidents by aging and muscle fatigue, it is… Read more

New assistive equipment to maximize human sensorimotor function

New assistive equipment to maximize human sensorimotor function

  A prototype for wearable equipment to support human motion has been developed at Hiroshima University, Japan. This wearable equipment, called the Sensorimotor Enhancing Suit (SEnS), enhances sensorimotor functions by reducing the muscle load of the upper limbs. SEnS is inexpensive because it is made of flexible fabrics using regular cloth and does not include any electronic devices. SEnS assists human sensorimotor functions and improves the quality of life of not only elderly individuals but also healthy people who work under extreme conditions. These results were published as proceedings of the 5th Augmented Human International Conference entitled “Unloading muscle activation enhances force perception” DOI: 10.1145/2582051.2582055. Recent advances in assistive technologies… Read more