Posts Tagged: materials science

Latest developments on the science of chiral materials discussed at ChiMag2016 Symposium

Latest developments on the science of chiral materials discussed at ChiMag2016 Symposium

The ChiMag 2016 Symposium is to be held from Sunday, Feb. 21 to Wednesday, Feb. 24 at Oriental Hotel Hiroshima in Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the symposium is to offer a good opportunity for researchers worldwide pursuing the nature of chiral magnets to discuss and exchange ideas. The main topics for the symposium are as follows: Nonlinear and topological spin textures in chiral magnets Probing spin chirality and crystallographic chirality by electron, neutron, X-ray, muon, and ultrasound beams Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in crystals with broken chiral symmetry Systematic synthesis of chiral magnetic crystals, including molecular-based, transition-metal, and rare-earth-based crystals Physics of helical and chiral superconductivity The online registration form is… Read more

A clue to generate electric current without energy consumption at room temperature

A clue to generate electric current without energy consumption at room temperature

  A group of researchers in Japan and China identified the requirements for the development of new types of extremely low power consumption electric devices by studying Cr-doped (Sb, Bi)2Te3 thin films. This study has been reported inĀ Nature Communications. At extremely low temperatures, an electric current flows around the edge of the film without energy loss, and under no external magnetic field. This attractive phenomenon is due to the material’s ferromagnetic properties; however, so far, it has been unclear how the material gains this property. For the first time, researchers have revealed the mechanism by which this occurs. “Hopefully, this achievement will lead to the creation of novel materials that… Read more

New membrane may solve fresh water shortages

New membrane may solve fresh water shortages

  Researchers at Hiroshima University have developed a technology that improves the removal of salt from seawater, a breakthrough that may alleviate the increasing demand for fresh water in some countries. “A global shortage of fresh water is a long-term challenge that mankind faces in this century,” said the director of the ROBUST membrane project, Professor Toshinori Tsuru. Professor Tsuru and his team have designed a new kind of ultra-thin layered membrane that acts as a sieve and separates salt from seawater to produce fresh water, a technique known as reverse osmosis. The membrane is partly made from silicon and overcomes several challenges of existing designs by tolerating the harsh… Read more

Draw out of the predicted interatomic force

Draw out of the predicted interatomic force

  Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Liquid Bi shows a peculiar dispersion of the acoustic mode, which is related to the Peierls distortion in the crystalline state. These results will provide valuable inspiration to researchers developing new materials in the nanotechnology field. Studies of the atomic dynamics in liquid Bi have been revisited more recently. The previous inelastic neutron scattering (INS) results for liquid Bi showed inconsistency for the inelastic excitation of the acoustic mode. These results were also different from the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) prediction that indicated that the peculiar atomic dynamics arose from an anisotropic interatomic force… Read more

Ultra-thin, all-inorganic molecular nanowires successfully compounded

Ultra-thin, all-inorganic molecular nanowires successfully compounded

  Nanowires are wired-shaped materials with diameters that are tens of nanometers or less. There are many types of nanowires, including semiconducting composite nanowires, metal oxide composite nanowires, and organic polymer nanowires, and they are typically used in functional materials and devices used as sensors, transistors, semiconductors, photonics devices, and solar cells. Molecular wires composed of only inorganic materials have attracted significant attention due to their stable structures, tunable chemical compositions, and tunable properties. However, there have only been a few reports regarding the development of all-inorganic molecular nanowires. Dr. Zhenxin Zhang and Prof. Wataru Ueda at the Catalysis Research Center at Hokkaido University (Prof. Ueda is currently working for… Read more

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Next-generation illumination using silicon quantum dot-based white-blue LED

  A Si quantum dot (QD)-based hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diode (LED) that exhibits white-blue electroluminescence has been fabricated by Professor Ken-ichi SAITOW (Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development, Hiroshima University), Graduate student Yunzi XIN (Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University), and their collaborators. A hybrid LED is expected to be a next-generation illumination device for producing flexible lighting and display, and this is achieved for the Si QD-based white-blue LED. For details, refer to “White-blue electroluminescence from a Si quantum dot hybrid light-emitting diode,” inĀ Applied Physics Letters; DOI: 10.1063/1.4921415. The Si QD hybrid LED was developed using a simple method; almost all processes were solution-based and conducted at… Read more