Posts Tagged: Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine

Meet Akiko Kubota

Meet Akiko Kubota

  In the summer of 2015, when she moved from Tokyo to Hiroshima, Akiko Kubota was surprised by two things: One, the love and excitement towards the Hiroshima Carp baseball team; and two, the fraught relationship concerning the atomic bomb and the people of Hiroshima. August 6, 2018, marks the 73rd anniversary of the day the United States detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima, killing over 700,000 people. As an archivist at Hiroshima University’s Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (RIRBPM), Kubota works to preserve the records of those who perished, as well as the memories of those who survived, the world’s first nuclear weapon attack…. Read more

Transcription factor helps tumors grow in low oxygen, resist anticancer therapies

Transcription factor helps tumors grow in low oxygen, resist anticancer therapies

  An international team of researchers found how cancer cells respond to DNA damage signaling when in low oxygen, or hypoxia. Through comprehensive gene expression analyses, the team determined how one family of genes controls DNA damage response, as well as how it weakens the effectiveness of anticancer therapies. Our bodies have strict molecular mechanisms that help us respond to hypoxia. These mechanisms are not just limited to helping us adapt to higher altitudes when climbing up a mountain. They also arise in diseases such as anemia, diabetes, or cancers. In the case of a new study led by Keiji Tanimoto’s team at Hiroshima University (HU), hypoxia indicates developments or… Read more

A genetic polymorphism associated with lung cancer progression

A genetic polymorphism associated with lung cancer progression

Genetic polymorphisms associated with cancer progression lead to variations in gene expression and may serve as prognostic markers for lung cancer. Researchers at the Hiroshima University and Saitama Medical University found that in patients with lung cancer, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may regulate gene and protein expression and be associated with poor prognosis. To establish this genetic polymorphism as a useful clinical prognostic marker and to further clarify its molecular mechanism, large-scale clinicopathological studies of lung cancer and/or other types of cancer are required for additional insights. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2 alpha or EPAS1) is important for cancer progression, and its overexpression is considered a putative biomarker for poor… Read more

How do harmful chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells obtain their nutrients?

How do harmful chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells obtain their nutrients?

Applicability of a new strategy to overcome disease recurrence in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia     A research group in Japan and in Korea has found a novel nutrient uptake process that maintains the activity of murine chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cells. Pharmacological inhibition of nutrient uptake decreased CML stem cell activity in vivo. Based on a report published on August 20, 2015 in Nature Communications, it has been established that certain nutrients support CML stem cell activity in vivo, thus pointing towards a potential therapeutic target for CML therapy. CML stem cells, the cellular source of a vast majority of CML cells, are reportedly responsible for the recurrence… Read more