Posts Categorized: Research News

Understanding money reduces worry about old age

Understanding money reduces worry about old age

People who possess a greater understanding of finance are less likely to fret about life in their twilight years. It seems financial literacy – the ability to understand how money works, enables people to accumulate more assets and income during their lifetime, and so increases confidence for the years ahead. Additionally, financial literacy seemingly engenders a greater perception for risk and enables those who have it to face off later-life’s dilemmas with ease.   These findings, from Associate Professor Yoshihiko Kadoya of Hiroshima University and Mostafa Saidur Rahim Khan of Nagoya University, stem from a study which asked people from across Japan to answer questions assessing their calculation skills, understanding… Read more

New appetite control mechanism found in brain – reason food looks even better when dieting

New appetite control mechanism found in brain – reason food looks even better when dieting

A newly discovered molecule increases appetite during fasting – and decreases it during gorging. The neuron-exciting protein, named NPGL – apparently aims to maintain body mass at a constant, come feast or famine. An evolutionary masterstroke, but not great news for those looking to trim down – or beef up for the summer. Over recent decades, our understanding of hunger has greatly increased, but this new discovery turns things on their head. Up until now, scientists knew that leptin – a hormone released by fatty tissue, reduces appetite, while ghrelin – a hormone released by stomach tissue makes us want to eat more. These hormones, in turn, activate a host… Read more

Promoting parasites: Researchers’ quest to identify freshwater fish parasites in Japan

Promoting parasites: Researchers’ quest to identify freshwater fish parasites in Japan

  Hiroshima University scientists have identified a new species of parasite infecting an invasive freshwater fish on the subtropical island of Okinawa, Japan. The results are part of a project to find parasites that have arrived in Japan with their non-native hosts and understand the role of parasites in natural ecosystems.  Tracking parasites can be one scientific method to monitor ecosystem health and attempt to conserve biodiversity. The project began in 2012 when one of the researchers was trying to fill some of his free time.  Masato Nitta, now a second-year PhD student at Hiroshima University, recognized some invasive fish in the stream that runs through the campus of the… Read more

Hopping to the Frontier: Following a frog’s evolutionary movements

Hopping to the Frontier: Following a frog’s evolutionary movements

  A common species of Asian tree frog may actually be two separate species according to new genetic data collected by an international group of scientists.  If the two groups of frogs are confirmed to be different species, assigning their scientific names may require searching historical records of foreign explorers in Japan during the 1800s. Before the frogs are officially recognized as two separate species, researchers will test if individual frogs from the two groups have unique physical or behavioral features and if they can produce healthy offspring. The project began when researchers at European universities expanded their studies on sex determination and population dynamics in amphibians to include Asian… Read more

Science of Sake in New Food Magazine

Science of Sake in New Food Magazine

In June 2016 we introduced research on the science of sake, a traditional alcoholic drink sometimes called Japanese rice wine.  A more detailed explanation of those results was included in a leading, UK-based food industry magazine called New Food, in October 2016.  You can read full issues of the magazine by visiting their website, http://www.newfoodmagazine.com/magazine/.  To read the article featuring the Hiroshima University research, click the link below to see a PDF version of the article. New Food magazine article from October 2016 featuring Hiroshima University results  

Mathematical analysis reveals architecture of the human genome

Mathematical analysis reveals architecture of the human genome

Mathematical analysis has led researchers in Japan to a formula that can describe the movement of DNA inside living human cells. Using these calculations, researchers may be able to reveal the 3D architecture of the human genome. In the future, these results may allow scientists to understand in detail how DNA is organized and accessed by essential cellular machinery. Previous techniques of studying the genome’s architecture have relied on methods that require killing the cells. This research project, involving collaborators at multiple institutes in Japan, used alternative molecular and cell biology techniques to keep the cells alive and collect data about the natural movement of DNA. DNA is often envisaged… Read more