Posts Categorized: Research News

Hopping to the Frontier: Following a frog’s evolutionary movements

Hopping to the Frontier: Following a frog’s evolutionary movements

  A common species of Asian tree frog may actually be two separate species according to new genetic data collected by an international group of scientists.  If the two groups of frogs are confirmed to be different species, assigning their scientific names may require searching historical records of foreign explorers in Japan during the 1800s…. Read more

Science of Sake in New Food Magazine

Science of Sake in New Food Magazine

In June 2016 we introduced research on the science of sake, a traditional alcoholic drink sometimes called Japanese rice wine.  A more detailed explanation of those results was included in a leading, UK-based food industry magazine called New Food, in October 2016.  You can read full issues of the magazine by visiting their website, http://www.newfoodmagazine.com/magazine/.  To… Read more

Mathematical analysis reveals architecture of the human genome

Mathematical analysis reveals architecture of the human genome

Mathematical analysis has led researchers in Japan to a formula that can describe the movement of DNA inside living human cells. Using these calculations, researchers may be able to reveal the 3D architecture of the human genome. In the future, these results may allow scientists to understand in detail how DNA is organized and accessed… Read more

Hiroshima University research on thin films of nanoparticles wins publication award

Hiroshima University research on thin films of nanoparticles wins publication award

Results from Hiroshima University researchers earned an Outstanding Paper award from the Journal of Chemical Engineering of Japan.  The research was completed by Assistant Professor Masaru Kubo, Yuki Mantani, and Professor Manabu Shimada.  Mantani was a Masters student at the time of the research. “Using our method, individual particles fall like snow,” said Professor Manabu… Read more

Well-wrapped feces allow lobsters to eat jellyfish stingers without injury

Well-wrapped feces allow lobsters to eat jellyfish stingers without injury

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuVvfpIBvY0″ width=”660″] Results advance efforts for sustainable lobster aquaculture Lobsters eat jellyfish without harm from the venomous stingers due to a series of physical adaptations.  Researchers from Hiroshima University examined lobster feces to discover that lobsters surround their servings of jellyfish in protective membranes that prevent the stingers from injecting their venom.  The results… Read more