Posts Tagged: cancer

Tumor energy source found by scientists at Hiroshima University, University of Cincinnati and Keio University

Tumor energy source found by scientists at Hiroshima University, University of Cincinnati and Keio University

Original text by University of Cincinnati. Edited by Emma Buchet, Hiroshima University. UC researchers unlock cancer cells’ feeding mechanism, central to tumor growth The findings could lead to new treatments by blocking tumor growth at its roots. An international team led by researchers from the University of Cincinnati and Japan’s Keio and Hiroshima universities has discovered the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells that drives the growth of the nucleolus and causes tumors to rapidly multiply. The findings, published Aug. 1 in the journal Nature Cell Biology, could lead to the development of new cancer treatments that would stop tumor growth by cutting the energy supply to the nucleolus. “The… Read more

Scientists discover origin of cell mask that hides stomach cancer

Scientists discover origin of cell mask that hides stomach cancer

A layer of cells that look like normal stomach lining on top of sites of stomach cancer can make it difficult to spot after removal of a Helicobacter pylori infection. In a recent study, researchers from Hiroshima University have uncovered the origin of this layer of cells: it is produced by the cancer tissue itself. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that lives in people’s stomachs. To survive the harsh environment these bacteria can neutralize stomach acid. H. pylori is the leading cause of stomach cancer, one of the most common types of cancer which can have a low survival rate. The bacteria cause inflammation by injecting… Read more

Family dynamics: molecules from the same family have different effects in cancer prognosis

Family dynamics: molecules from the same family have different effects in cancer prognosis

Scientists observe that one molecule increases liposarcoma tumor cell spread and aggression while another molecule from the same family decreases migration and cell proliferation. Researchers at Hiroshima University have found that different levels of two molecules of the same family—TIMP-1 and TIMP-4—can influence prognosis of liposarcoma. High levels of TIMP-1 lead to a poor prognosis while high TIMP-4 indicates a less severe form of liposarcoma. This study, published in Carcinogenesis 10th May, described the molecules’ mechanism of action through the YAP/TAZ pathway. Further research can lead to new treatments and better methods of diagnosis for liposarcoma. Different types of cancer have different prognoses (medical outcomes) and some are easier to… Read more

Transcription factor helps tumors grow in low oxygen, resist anticancer therapies

Transcription factor helps tumors grow in low oxygen, resist anticancer therapies

  An international team of researchers found how cancer cells respond to DNA damage signaling when in low oxygen, or hypoxia. Through comprehensive gene expression analyses, the team determined how one family of genes controls DNA damage response, as well as how it weakens the effectiveness of anticancer therapies. Our bodies have strict molecular mechanisms that help us respond to hypoxia. These mechanisms are not just limited to helping us adapt to higher altitudes when climbing up a mountain. They also arise in diseases such as anemia, diabetes, or cancers. In the case of a new study led by Keiji Tanimoto’s team at Hiroshima University (HU), hypoxia indicates developments or… Read more

Hideki Ohdan, gastroenterology

Hideki Ohdan, gastroenterology

A Conversation with Distinguished Professor Hideki Ohdan Distinguished Professor Hideki Ohdan identifies himself as a “surgeon scientist.” He grew up in Hiroshima city and completed a Medical Degree in 1988 and a PhD degree in 1997, both from Hiroshima University. Now, he leads an active medical practice and research laboratory at Hiroshima University Hospital. His career has focused on removing biological barriers to match organ donors with patients who need organ transplants. This project is driven by the immediate needs of clinical patients, but involves solving a larger scientific mystery: how does the immune system recognize its own body as native cells to ignore and recognize foreign cells as invaders… Read more

Studying cancer DNA in blood may help personalize treatment in liver cancer

Studying cancer DNA in blood may help personalize treatment in liver cancer

  Fragments of cancer DNA circulating in a patient’s bloodstream could help doctors deliver more personalized treatment for liver cancer, Japanese researchers report. The new research may help address a particular challenge posed by liver cancers, which can be difficult to analyze safely. One serious risk of existing biopsy methods is that doctors who want to obtain a tumor sample for analysis might cause the cancer to spread into the space around organs. “Doctors need non-invasive methods that will allow them to safely study cancer progression and characterize the genomic features of a patient’s tumor,” said Professor Kazuaki Chayama, a principal investigator in this study. “Testing for these circulating DNA… Read more