Posts Tagged: Graduate School of Science

Simultaneous live imaging of a specific gene’s transcription and dynamics

Simultaneous live imaging of a specific gene’s transcription and dynamics

The Real-time Observation of Localization and EXpression (ROLEX) system   Dr. Hiroshi Ochiai and his colleagues, Dr. Takeshi Sugawara (Research Center for the Mathematics on Chromatin Live Dynamics [RcMcD] at Hiroshima University) and Professor Takashi Yamamoto (Graduate School of Science at Hiroshima University), have established a novel live-imaging method termed the “Real-time Observation of Localization and EXpression (ROLEX)” system. This system enables simultaneous measurements of the transcriptional activity and nuclear position of endogenous genes using MS2 transcription imaging and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) gene-imaging techniques.   Dr. Ochiai stated, “By using only existing techniques, such as the chromatin conformation capture (3C)-related method and fluorescence in situ hybridization… Read more

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Next-generation illumination using silicon quantum dot-based white-blue LED

  A Si quantum dot (QD)-based hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diode (LED) that exhibits white-blue electroluminescence has been fabricated by Professor Ken-ichi SAITOW (Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development, Hiroshima University), Graduate student Yunzi XIN (Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University), and their collaborators. A hybrid LED is expected to be a next-generation illumination device for producing flexible lighting and display, and this is achieved for the Si QD-based white-blue LED. For details, refer to “White-blue electroluminescence from a Si quantum dot hybrid light-emitting diode,” inĀ Applied Physics Letters; DOI: 10.1063/1.4921415. The Si QD hybrid LED was developed using a simple method; almost all processes were solution-based and conducted at… Read more

A novel technique for gene insertion by genome editing

A novel technique for gene insertion by genome editing

Easy, accurate, and highly efficient gene knock-in in a variety of cells and organisms Using a novel gene knock-in technique, effective insertion of an exogenous gene was demonstrated in human cells and in animal models, including silkworms and frogs. This strategy universally enables gene knock-in not only in cultured cells, but also in various organisms. Genome editing using programmable nucleases enables homologous recombination (HR)-mediated gene knock-in. HR activity, however, is relatively low in most cultured cells and organisms. This problem presents technical hurdles for the application of HR-mediated knock-in technology in the field of life sciences. Professor Takashi Yamamoto and his colleagues, Dr. Ken-ichi T. Suzuki and Dr. Tetsushi Sakuma,… Read more