Posts Tagged: robotics

Research collaboration between Hiroshima University and Arizona State University

Research collaboration between Hiroshima University and Arizona State University

On the first week of July, members from Arizona State University (ASU) visited Hiroshima University to discuss their research and recent close collaboration. Science Communication Fellow Emma Buchet had the chance to sit down with Ramin Tadayon, Troy McDaniel from ASU and Yuichi Kurita from HU to find out more about their research, collaboration and plans for the future. This collaboration began in 2018. “We started talking with HU probably two years ago. It really all started with us coming together and just talking about our interests. It was just a natural fit,” describes Troy McDaniel, Associate Director, Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing (CUbiC) ASU. Since then HU has made multiple… Read more

3D printed prosthetic hand can guess how you play Rock, Paper, Scissors

3D printed prosthetic hand can guess how you play Rock, Paper, Scissors

A new 3D-printed prosthetic hand can learn the wearers’ movement patterns to help amputee patients perform daily tasks, reports a study published this week in Science Robotics. Losing a limb, either through illness or accident, can present emotional and physical challenges for an amputee, damaging their quality of life. Prosthetic limbs can be very useful but are often expensive and difficult to use. The Biological Systems Engineering Lab at Hiroshima University has developed a new 3D printed prosthetic hand combined with a computer interface, which is their cheapest, lightest model that is more reactive to motion intent than before. Previous generations of their prosthetic hands have been made of metal,… Read more

Wearable equipment supports human motion where and when needed

Wearable equipment supports human motion where and when needed

  A new model of pneumatic muscle and an active type of assistive equipment incorporating this pneumatic muscle has been developed at Hiroshima University and Daiya Industry Co. Ltd., Japan. This wearable equipment, called the Unplugged Powered Suit (UPS), supports human movement without requiring any electronic devices and tanks because it employs a newly developed pneumatic muscle named Pneumatic Gel Muscle (PGM) as an actuator. The UPS improves the quality of life of not only elderly individuals but also healthy people who enjoy sports activities. The UPS will be displayed at the International Robot Exhibition 2015 in December. To prevent injury and accidents by aging and muscle fatigue, it is… Read more